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Home > Standards & Guidances > Methodological Guide

ENCePP Guide on Methodological Standards in Pharmacoepidemiology

 

10.1.2. General aspects

Several initiatives have promoted the conduct of CER and REA and proposed general methodological guidance to help in the design and analysis of such studies.

 

The Methodological Guidelines for Rapid Relative Effectiveness Assessment of Pharmaceuticals developed by EUnetHTA cover a broad spectrum of issues on REA. They address methodological challenges that are encountered by health technology assessors while performing rapid REA and provide and discuss practical recommendations on definitions to be used and how to extract, assess and present relevant information in assessment reports. Specific topics covered include the choice of comparators, strengths and limitations of various data sources and methods, internal and external validity of studies, the selection and assessment of endpoints (including composite and surrogate endpoints and Health Related Quality of Life [HRQoL]) and the evaluation of relative safety.

 

AHRQ’s Developing a Protocol for Observational Comparative Effectiveness Research: A User’s Guide identifies minimal standards and best practices for observational CER. It provides principles on a wide range of topics for designing research and developing protocols, with relevant questions to be addressed and checklists of key elements to be considered. The GRACE Principles provide guidance on the evaluation of the quality of observational CER studies to help decision-makers in recognizing high-quality studies and researchers in design and conduct high quality studies. A checklist to evaluate the quality of observational CER studies is also provided. The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) addressed several key issues of CER in three publications: Part I includes the selection of study design and data sources and the reporting and interpretation of results in the light of policy questions; Part II relates to the validity and generalisability of study results, with an overview of potential threats to validity; Part III includes approaches to reducing such threats and, in particular, to controlling of confounding. The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Methodology Standards document provides standards for patient-centred outcome research that aims to improve the way research questions are selected, formulated and addressed, and findings reported. The PCORI group has recently published how stakeholders may be involved in PCORI research, Stakeholder-Driven Comparative Effectiveness Research (JAMA 2015; 314: 2235-2236). In a Journal of Clinical Epidemiology series of articles, the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) working group offers a structured process for rating quality of evidence and grading strength of recommendations in systematic reviews, health technology assessment and clinical practice guidelines. The GRADE group recommends individuals new to GRADE to first read the 6-part 2008 BMJ series.

 

A guideline on methods for performing systematic reviews of existing comparative effectiveness research has been published by the AHRQ (Methods Guide for Effectiveness and Comparative Effectiveness Reviews).

The RWE Navigator website has been developed by the IMI GetReal consortium to provide recommendations on the use of real-world evidence for decision-making on effectiveness and relative effectiveness of medicinal products. It discusses important topics such as the sources of real-world data, study designs, approaches to summarising and synthesising the evidence, modelling of effectiveness and methods to adjust for bias and governance aspects. It also presents a glossary of terms and case studies relevant for RWD research, with a focus on effectiveness research.

 

 

Individual Chapters:

 

1. Introduction

2. Formulating the research question

3. Development of the study protocol

4. Approaches to data collection

4.1. Primary data collection

4.1.1. Surveys

4.1.2. Randomised clinical trials

4.2. Secondary data collection

4.3. Patient registries

4.3.1. Definition

4.3.2. Conceptual differences between a registry and a study

4.3.3. Methodological guidance

4.3.4. Registries which capture special populations

4.3.5. Disease registries in regulatory practice and health technology assessment

4.4. Spontaneous report database

4.5. Social media and electronic devices

4.6. Research networks

4.6.1. General considerations

4.6.2. Models of studies using multiple data sources

4.6.3. Challenges of different models

5. Study design and methods

5.1. Definition and validation of drug exposure, outcomes and covariates

5.1.1. Assessment of exposure

5.1.2. Assessment of outcomes

5.1.3. Assessment of covariates

5.1.4. Validation

5.2. Bias and confounding

5.2.1. Selection bias

5.2.2. Information bias

5.2.3. Confounding

5.3. Methods to handle bias and confounding

5.3.1. New-user designs

5.3.2. Case-only designs

5.3.3. Disease risk scores

5.3.4. Propensity scores

5.3.5. Instrumental variables

5.3.6. Prior event rate ratios

5.3.7. Handling time-dependent confounding in the analysis

5.4. Effect measure modification and interaction

5.5. Ecological analyses and case-population studies

5.6. Pragmatic trials and large simple trials

5.6.1. Pragmatic trials

5.6.2. Large simple trials

5.6.3. Randomised database studies

5.7. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis

5.8. Signal detection methodology and application

6. The statistical analysis plan

6.1. General considerations

6.2. Statistical analysis plan structure

6.3. Handling of missing data

7. Quality management

8. Dissemination and reporting

8.1. Principles of communication

8.2. Communication of study results

9. Data protection and ethical aspects

9.1. Patient and data protection

9.2. Scientific integrity and ethical conduct

10. Specific topics

10.1. Comparative effectiveness research

10.1.1. Introduction

10.1.2. General aspects

10.1.3. Prominent issues in CER

10.2. Vaccine safety and effectiveness

10.2.1. Vaccine safety

10.2.2. Vaccine effectiveness

10.3. Design and analysis of pharmacogenetic studies

10.3.1. Introduction

10.3.2. Identification of generic variants

10.3.3. Study designs

10.3.4. Data collection

10.3.5. Data analysis

10.3.6. Reporting

10.3.7. Clinical practice guidelines

10.3.8. Resources

Annex 1. Guidance on conducting systematic revies and meta-analyses of completed comparative pharmacoepidemiological studies of safety outcomes