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Home > Standards & Guidances > Methodological Guide

ENCePP Guide on Methodological Standards in Pharmacoepidemiology

 

10.2.2. Vaccine effectiveness

10.2.2.1. Definitions

 

Vaccine effects and impact of vaccination programmes in post-licensure studies (Vaccine 2013;31(48):5634-42) reviews and delineates, among the various evaluations of vaccine intervention, what applies to the effectiveness of vaccine and to the impact of vaccination programmes, proposes epidemiological measures of public health impact, describes relevant methods to measure these effects and discusses the assumptions and potential biases involved.

 

10.2.2.2. Traditional cohort and case-control studies

 

Generic protocols for retrospective case-control studies and retrospective cohort studies to assess the effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in EU Member States based on computerised databases were published by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). They describe the information that should be collected by country and region in vaccine effectiveness studies and the data sources that may be available to identify virus-related outcomes a vaccine is intended to avert, including hospital registers, computerised primary care databases, specific surveillance systems (i.e. laboratory surveillance, hospital surveillance, primary care surveillance) and laboratory registers. Based on a meta-analysis comprising 49 cohort studies and 10 case-control studies, Efficacy and effectiveness of influenza vaccines in elderly people: a systematic review (Lancet 2005;366(9492):1165-74) highlights the heterogeneity of outcomes and study populations included in such studies and the high likelihood of selection bias.

 

Non-specific effects of vaccines, such as a decrease of mortality, have been claimed in observational studies but generally can be affected by bias and confounding. Data collection in observational studies (Trop Med Int Health 2009;14(9):969-76.) and Methodological issues in the design and analysis of cohort studies (Trop Med Int Health 2009;14(9):977-85) provide recommendations for vaccine observational studies conducted in countries with high mortality; these recommendations have wider relevance.

 

10.2.2.3. Screening method
 

The screening method estimates vaccine effectiveness by comparing vaccination coverage in positive cases of a disease (e.g. influenza) with the vaccination coverage in the population from which the cases are derived (e.g., the same age group). If representative data on cases and vaccination coverage are available, it can provide an inexpensive and ready-to-use method that can be useful in providing early effectiveness estimates or identify changes in effectiveness over time. However, Application of the screening method to monitor influenza vaccine effectiveness among the elderly in Germany (BMC Infect Dis. 2015;15(1):137) emphasises that accurate and age-specific vaccine coverage rates are crucial to provide valid VE estimates. Since adjusting for important confounders and the assessment of product-specific VE is generally not possible, this method should be considered only a supplementary tool for assessing crude VE.

 

10.2.2.4. Indirect cohort (Broome) method

 

The indirect cohort method is a case-control type design which uses cases caused by non-vaccine serotypes as controls. Use of surveillance data to estimate the effectiveness of the 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in children less than 5 years of age over a 9 year period (Vaccine 2012;30(27):4067-72) applied this method to evaluate the effectiveness of a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and compared the results to the effectiveness measured using a standard case-control study conducted during the same time period. The authors considered the method would be most useful shortly after vaccine introduction, and less useful in a setting of very high vaccine coverage and fewer vaccine-type cases. Using the Indirect Cohort Design to Estimate the Effectiveness of the Seven Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in England and Wales (PLoS ONE 6(12):e28435. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0028435) describes how the method was used to estimate effectiveness of various numbers of doses as well as for each vaccine serotype.

 

10.2.2.5. Density case-control design

 

Effectiveness of live-attenuated Japanese encephalitis vaccine (SA14-14-2): a case-control study (Lancet 1996;347(9015):1583-6) describes a case control study of incident cases in which the control group consisted of all village-matched children of a given age who were at risk of developing disease at the time that the case occurred (density sampling). The effect measured is an incidence density rate ratio.

 

10.2.2.6. Test negative design
 

The article The test-negative design for estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness (Vaccine 2013;31(17):2165-8) explains the rationale, assumptions and analysis of the test-negative study as applied to influenza VE. Study subjects are all persons who seek care for an acute respiratory illness and influenza VE is estimated from the ratio of the odds of vaccination among subjects testing positive for influenza to the odds of vaccination among subject testing negative. This design is less susceptible to bias due to misclassification of infection and the confounding by health care-seeking behaviour, at the cost of difficult-to-test assumptions.

 

Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in preventing cases and hospitalizations due to rotavirus gastroenteritis in Navarre, Spain (Vaccine 2012;30(3):539-43) evaluates effectiveness using a test negative case-control design based on electronic clinical reports. Cases were children with confirmed rotavirus and controls were those who tested negative for rotavirus in all samples. The test-negative design was based on an assumption that the rate of gastroenteritis caused by pathogens other than rotavirus is the same in both vaccinated and unvaccinated persons. This approach may rule out differences in parental attitude when seeking medical care and of physician differences in making decisions about stool sampling or hospitalisation. A limitation is sensitivity of antigen detection which may underestimate vaccine effectiveness. In addition, if virus serotype is not available, it is not possible to study the association between vaccine failure and a possible mismatch of vaccine strains and circulating strains of virus.

 

The article 2012/13 influenza vaccine effectiveness against hospitalised influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B: estimates from a European network of hospitals (EuroSurveill 2015;20(2):pii=21011) illustrates a multicentre test-negative case-control study to estimate influenza VE in 18 hospitals. It is believed that confounding due to health-seeking behaviour is minimised since, in the study sites, all people needing hospitalisation are likely to be hospitalised. The study Trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness for the prevention of laboratory-confirmed influenza in a Scottish population 2000 to 2009 (EuroSurveill 2015;20(8):pii=21043) applied this method using a Scotland-wide linkage of patient-level primary care, hospital and virological swab data over nine influenza seasons and discusses strengths and weaknesses of the design in this context.

 

10.2.2.7. Case coverage design

 

This design is described in section 10.2.1.4.

 

10.2.2.8. Impact assessment
 

A generic study protocol to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccination in EU Member States has been published by the ECDC. It recommends the information that needs to be collected to compare the incidence/proportion of rotavirus cases in the period before and after the introduction of the vaccine. These generic protocols need to be adapted to each country/regions and specific situation.

 

The impact of vaccination can be quantified in children in the age group targeted for the vaccine (overall effect) or in children of other age groups (indirect effect). The direct effect of a vaccine, however, needs to be defined by the protection it confers given a specific amount of exposure to infection and not just a comparable exposure. Direct and indirect effects in vaccine efficacy and effectiveness (Am J Epidemiol 1991; 133(4):323-31) describes how parameters intended to measure direct effects must be robust and interpretable in the midst of complex indirect effects of vaccine intervention programmes.

 

Impact of rotavirus vaccination in regions with low and moderate vaccine uptake in Germany (Hum Vaccin Immunother 2012; 8(10):1407-15) describes an impact assessment of rotavirus vaccination comparing the incidence rates of hospitalisations before, and in seasons after, vaccine introduction using data from national mandatory disease reporting system.

 

First year experience of rotavirus immunisation programme in Finland (Vaccine 2012; 31(1):176-82) estimates the impact of a rotavirus immunisation programme on the total hospital inpatient and outpatient treated acute gastroenteritis burden and on severe rotavirus disease burden during the first year after introduction. The study may be considered as a vaccine-probe-study, where unspecific disease burden prevented by immunisation is assumed to be caused by the agent the vaccine is targeted against.

 

10.2.2.9. Methods to study waning immunity

 

The study of vaccine effectiveness against diseases where immunity wanes over time requires consideration of both the within-host dynamics of the pathogen and immune system as well as the associated population-level transmission dynamics. Implications of vaccination and waning immunity (Proc Biol Sci 2009; 276(1664):2071-80) seeks to combine immunological and epidemiological models for measles infection to examine the interplay between disease incidence, waning immunity and boosting.

 

 

Individual Chapters:

 

1. Introduction

2. Formulating the research question

3. Development of the study protocol

4. Approaches to data collection

4.1. Primary data collection

4.1.1. Surveys

4.1.2. Randomised clinical trials

4.2. Secondary data collection

4.3. Patient registries

4.3.1. Definition

4.3.2. Conceptual differences between a registry and a study

4.3.3. Methodological guidance

4.3.4. Registries which capture special populations

4.3.5. Disease registries in regulatory practice and health technology assessment

4.4. Spontaneous report database

4.5. Social media and electronic devices

4.6. Research networks

4.6.1. General considerations

4.6.2. Models of studies using multiple data sources

4.6.3. Challenges of different models

5. Study design and methods

5.1. Definition and validation of drug exposure, outcomes and covariates

5.1.1. Assessment of exposure

5.1.2. Assessment of outcomes

5.1.3. Assessment of covariates

5.1.4. Validation

5.2. Bias and confounding

5.2.1. Selection bias

5.2.2. Information bias

5.2.3. Confounding

5.3. Methods to handle bias and confounding

5.3.1. New-user designs

5.3.2. Case-only designs

5.3.3. Disease risk scores

5.3.4. Propensity scores

5.3.5. Instrumental variables

5.3.6. Prior event rate ratios

5.3.7. Handling time-dependent confounding in the analysis

5.4. Effect measure modification and interaction

5.5. Ecological analyses and case-population studies

5.6. Pragmatic trials and large simple trials

5.6.1. Pragmatic trials

5.6.2. Large simple trials

5.6.3. Randomised database studies

5.7. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis

5.8. Signal detection methodology and application

6. The statistical analysis plan

6.1. General considerations

6.2. Statistical analysis plan structure

6.3. Handling of missing data

7. Quality management

8. Dissemination and reporting

8.1. Principles of communication

8.2. Communication of study results

9. Data protection and ethical aspects

9.1. Patient and data protection

9.2. Scientific integrity and ethical conduct

10. Specific topics

10.1. Comparative effectiveness research

10.1.1. Introduction

10.1.2. General aspects

10.1.3. Prominent issues in CER

10.2. Vaccine safety and effectiveness

10.2.1. Vaccine safety

10.2.2. Vaccine effectiveness

10.3. Design and analysis of pharmacogenetic studies

10.3.1. Introduction

10.3.2. Identification of generic variants

10.3.3. Study designs

10.3.4. Data collection

10.3.5. Data analysis

10.3.6. Reporting

10.3.7. Clinical practice guidelines

10.3.8. Resources

Annex 1. Guidance on conducting systematic revies and meta-analyses of completed comparative pharmacoepidemiological studies of safety outcomes