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Home > Standards & Guidances > Methodological Guide

ENCePP Guide on Methodological Standards in Pharmacoepidemiology

 

4.3.1. Definition

A registry is an organised system that uses observational methods to collect uniform data on specified outcomes in a population defined by a particular disease, condition or exposure. A register is the database deriving from the registry (such as the EU PAS Register), and the difference between the two terms should be clearly understood even if they are often used interchangeably. The terms ‘register’ or ‘registry’ are sometimes incorrectly used to designate an exhaustive list of all patients who meet the eligibility criteria of a study, regardless of their inclusion in the study. The term ‘patient log-list’ could be used for this purpose.

 

A patient registry should be considered as a structure for the standardised recording of data from routine clinical practice on individual patients identified by the diagnosis of a disease, the occurrence of a condition (e.g., pregnancy), the prescription of a medicinal product (e.g., monoclonal antibodies) , a hospital encounter, or any combination of these.

 

In European Nordic countries where there is a comprehensive registration of hospital data for a high proportion of the population, government-administered patient registries are administrative systems based on hospital encounters including visit information, diagnoses and procedures, such as the Norwegian Patient Registry, the Danish National Patient Registry or the Swedish National Patient Register. They may however lack information on lifestyle factors, patient-related outcomes and laboratory data. A review of 103 Swedish Healthcare Quality Registries (J Intern Med 2015; 277(1): 94–136) describes additional healthcare quality registries focusing on specific disorders initiated in Sweden mostly by physicians with data on aspects of disease management, self-reported quality of life, lifestyle, and general health status, providing an important source for research.

 

 

 

 

Individual Chapters:

 

1. Introduction

2. Formulating the research question

3. Development of the study protocol

4. Approaches to data collection

4.1. Primary data collection

4.1.1. Surveys

4.1.2. Randomised clinical trials

4.2. Secondary data collection

4.3. Patient registries

4.3.1. Definition

4.3.2. Conceptual differences between a registry and a study

4.3.3. Methodological guidance

4.3.4. Registries which capture special populations

4.3.5. Disease registries in regulatory practice and health technology assessment

4.4. Spontaneous report database

4.5. Social media and electronic devices

4.6. Research networks

4.6.1. General considerations

4.6.2. Models of studies using multiple data sources

4.6.3. Challenges of different models

5. Study design and methods

5.1. Definition and validation of drug exposure, outcomes and covariates

5.1.1. Assessment of exposure

5.1.2. Assessment of outcomes

5.1.3. Assessment of covariates

5.1.4. Validation

5.2. Bias and confounding

5.2.1. Selection bias

5.2.2. Information bias

5.2.3. Confounding

5.3. Methods to handle bias and confounding

5.3.1. New-user designs

5.3.2. Case-only designs

5.3.3. Disease risk scores

5.3.4. Propensity scores

5.3.5. Instrumental variables

5.3.6. Prior event rate ratios

5.3.7. Handling time-dependent confounding in the analysis

5.4. Effect measure modification and interaction

5.5. Ecological analyses and case-population studies

5.6. Pragmatic trials and large simple trials

5.6.1. Pragmatic trials

5.6.2. Large simple trials

5.6.3. Randomised database studies

5.7. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis

5.8. Signal detection methodology and application

6. The statistical analysis plan

6.1. General considerations

6.2. Statistical analysis plan structure

6.3. Handling of missing data

7. Quality management

8. Dissemination and reporting

8.1. Principles of communication

8.2. Communication of study results

9. Data protection and ethical aspects

9.1. Patient and data protection

9.2. Scientific integrity and ethical conduct

10. Specific topics

10.1. Comparative effectiveness research

10.1.1. Introduction

10.1.2. General aspects

10.1.3. Prominent issues in CER

10.2. Vaccine safety and effectiveness

10.2.1. Vaccine safety

10.2.2. Vaccine effectiveness

10.3. Design and analysis of pharmacogenetic studies

10.3.1. Introduction

10.3.2. Identification of generic variants

10.3.3. Study designs

10.3.4. Data collection

10.3.5. Data analysis

10.3.6. Reporting

10.3.7. Clinical practice guidelines

10.3.8. Resources

Annex 1. Guidance on conducting systematic revies and meta-analyses of completed comparative pharmacoepidemiological studies of safety outcomes