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Home > Standards & Guidances > Methodological Guide

ENCePP Guide on Methodological Standards in Pharmacoepidemiology

 

4.3.4. Registries which capture special populations

In assessing both safety and effectiveness, special populations can be identified based on age (e.g., paediatric or elderly), pregnancy status, renal or hepatic function, race, or genetic differences. Some registries are focused on these particular populations. Examples of these are the birth registries in Nordic countries. 

 

The FDA’s Guidance for Industry-Establishing Pregnancy Exposure Registries advises on good practice for designing a pregnancy registry with a description of research methods and elements to be addressed. The Systematic overview of data sources for drug safety in pregnancy research provides an inventory of pregnancy exposure registries and alternative data sources on safety of prenatal drug exposure and discusses their strengths and limitations. Example of population-based registers allowing to assess outcome of drug exposure during pregnancy are EUROCAT, the European network of registries for the epidemiologic surveillance of congenital anomalies, and the pan-Nordic registries which record drug use during pregnancy as illustrated in Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and venlafaxine in early pregnancy and risk of birth defects: population based cohort study and sibling design (BMJ 2015;350:h1798).

 

For paediatric populations, detailed information on neonatal age (e.g. in days, not just in years), pharmacokinetic differences and organ maturation need to be considered. The CHMP Guideline on Conduct of Pharmacovigilance for Medicines Used by the Paediatric Population provides further relevant information. An example of registry which focuses on paediatric patients is Pharmachild, which captures children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing treatment with methotrexate or biologic agents.

 

Other registries that focus on special populations (e.g., the UK Renal Registry) can be found in the ENCePP Inventory of data sources.

 

 

 

 

Individual Chapters:

 

1. Introduction

2. Formulating the research question

3. Development of the study protocol

4. Approaches to data collection

4.1. Primary data collection

4.1.1. Surveys

4.1.2. Randomised clinical trials

4.2. Secondary data collection

4.3. Patient registries

4.3.1. Definition

4.3.2. Conceptual differences between a registry and a study

4.3.3. Methodological guidance

4.3.4. Registries which capture special populations

4.3.5. Disease registries in regulatory practice and health technology assessment

4.4. Spontaneous report database

4.5. Social media and electronic devices

4.6. Research networks

4.6.1. General considerations

4.6.2. Models of studies using multiple data sources

4.6.3. Challenges of different models

5. Study design and methods

5.1. Definition and validation of drug exposure, outcomes and covariates

5.1.1. Assessment of exposure

5.1.2. Assessment of outcomes

5.1.3. Assessment of covariates

5.1.4. Validation

5.2. Bias and confounding

5.2.1. Selection bias

5.2.2. Information bias

5.2.3. Confounding

5.3. Methods to handle bias and confounding

5.3.1. New-user designs

5.3.2. Case-only designs

5.3.3. Disease risk scores

5.3.4. Propensity scores

5.3.5. Instrumental variables

5.3.6. Prior event rate ratios

5.3.7. Handling time-dependent confounding in the analysis

5.4. Effect measure modification and interaction

5.5. Ecological analyses and case-population studies

5.6. Pragmatic trials and large simple trials

5.6.1. Pragmatic trials

5.6.2. Large simple trials

5.6.3. Randomised database studies

5.7. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis

5.8. Signal detection methodology and application

6. The statistical analysis plan

6.1. General considerations

6.2. Statistical analysis plan structure

6.3. Handling of missing data

7. Quality management

8. Dissemination and reporting

8.1. Principles of communication

8.2. Communication of study results

9. Data protection and ethical aspects

9.1. Patient and data protection

9.2. Scientific integrity and ethical conduct

10. Specific topics

10.1. Comparative effectiveness research

10.1.1. Introduction

10.1.2. General aspects

10.1.3. Prominent issues in CER

10.2. Vaccine safety and effectiveness

10.2.1. Vaccine safety

10.2.2. Vaccine effectiveness

10.3. Design and analysis of pharmacogenetic studies

10.3.1. Introduction

10.3.2. Identification of generic variants

10.3.3. Study designs

10.3.4. Data collection

10.3.5. Data analysis

10.3.6. Reporting

10.3.7. Clinical practice guidelines

10.3.8. Resources

Annex 1. Guidance on conducting systematic revies and meta-analyses of completed comparative pharmacoepidemiological studies of safety outcomes