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Home > Standards & Guidances > Methodological Guide

ENCePP Guide on Methodological Standards in Pharmacoepidemiology

 

5.1.1. Assessment of exposure

 

In pharmacoepidemiology studies, exposure data originate mainly from four sources: data on prescribing (e.g. CPRD primary care data), data on dispensing (e.g. PHARMO outpatient pharmacy database), data on payment for medication (namely claims data, e.g. IMS LifeLink PharMetrics Plus) or from data collected from surveys. The population included in these data sources follows a process of attrition: drugs that are prescribed are not necessarily dispensed, and drugs that are dispensed are not necessarily ingested. In Primary non-adherence in general practice: a Danish register study (Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2014;70(6):757–63), 9.3% of all prescriptions for new therapies were never redeemed at the pharmacy, although with some differences between therapeutic and patient groups. The attrition from dispensing to ingestion is even more difficult to measure, as it involves uncertainties about what dispensed drugs are actually taken by the patients and about the patients’ ability to account accurately for their intake. In particular, paediatric adherence is additionally dependent on parents.

 

Exposure definitions can include simple dichotomous variables (e.g. ever exposed vs. never exposed) or they can be more detailed, including estimates of exposure windows (e.g. current vs. past exposure) or levels of exposure (e.g. current dosage, cumulative dosage over time). Consideration should be given to the level of detail available from the data sources on the timing of exposure, including the quantity prescribed, dispensed or ingested and the capture of dosage instructions when evaluating the feasibility of constructing such variables. This will vary across data sources and exposures (e.g. estimating contraceptive pill ingestion is typically easier than estimating rescue medication for asthma attacks). Discussions with clinicians regarding sensible assumptions will inform variable definition.

 

The Methodology chapter of the book Drug Utilization Research. Methods and Applications (M. Elseviers, B. Wettermark, A.B. Almarsdottir et al. Ed. Wiley Blackwell, 2016) discusses different methods for data collection on drug utilisation.

 

 

Individual Chapters:

 

1. Introduction

2. Formulating the research question

3. Development of the study protocol

4. Approaches to data collection

4.1. Primary data collection

4.1.1. Surveys

4.1.2. Randomised clinical trials

4.2. Secondary data collection

4.3. Patient registries

4.3.1. Definition

4.3.2. Conceptual differences between a registry and a study

4.3.3. Methodological guidance

4.3.4. Registries which capture special populations

4.3.5. Disease registries in regulatory practice and health technology assessment

4.4. Spontaneous report database

4.5. Social media and electronic devices

4.6. Research networks

4.6.1. General considerations

4.6.2. Models of studies using multiple data sources

4.6.3. Challenges of different models

5. Study design and methods

5.1. Definition and validation of drug exposure, outcomes and covariates

5.1.1. Assessment of exposure

5.1.2. Assessment of outcomes

5.1.3. Assessment of covariates

5.1.4. Validation

5.2. Bias and confounding

5.2.1. Selection bias

5.2.2. Information bias

5.2.3. Confounding

5.3. Methods to handle bias and confounding

5.3.1. New-user designs

5.3.2. Case-only designs

5.3.3. Disease risk scores

5.3.4. Propensity scores

5.3.5. Instrumental variables

5.3.6. Prior event rate ratios

5.3.7. Handling time-dependent confounding in the analysis

5.4. Effect measure modification and interaction

5.5. Ecological analyses and case-population studies

5.6. Pragmatic trials and large simple trials

5.6.1. Pragmatic trials

5.6.2. Large simple trials

5.6.3. Randomised database studies

5.7. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis

5.8. Signal detection methodology and application

6. The statistical analysis plan

6.1. General considerations

6.2. Statistical analysis plan structure

6.3. Handling of missing data

7. Quality management

8. Dissemination and reporting

8.1. Principles of communication

8.2. Communication of study results

9. Data protection and ethical aspects

9.1. Patient and data protection

9.2. Scientific integrity and ethical conduct

10. Specific topics

10.1. Comparative effectiveness research

10.1.1. Introduction

10.1.2. General aspects

10.1.3. Prominent issues in CER

10.2. Vaccine safety and effectiveness

10.2.1. Vaccine safety

10.2.2. Vaccine effectiveness

10.3. Design and analysis of pharmacogenetic studies

10.3.1. Introduction

10.3.2. Identification of generic variants

10.3.3. Study designs

10.3.4. Data collection

10.3.5. Data analysis

10.3.6. Reporting

10.3.7. Clinical practice guidelines

10.3.8. Resources

Annex 1. Guidance on conducting systematic revies and meta-analyses of completed comparative pharmacoepidemiological studies of safety outcomes